Here's how the full moon helped free the stuck ship Ever Given in the Suez Canal

It took a little help from the full moon to free the massive Ever Given cargo ship from its perch stranded in the Suez Canal.

For nearly a week, the boat debacle took the internet by storm: a 1,300-foot-long (400 meters) container ship had gotten wedged into a key trading passageway, blocking all traffic. A digger, dwarfed by the massive boat, came to scratch away at the canal’s sides, an allegory of every quixotic attempt we make to manage the behemoth crashes in our own lives.

Even from space, on the International Space Station and 250 miles (400 kilometers) above the fray, all eyes turned to the Ever Given. Russian Cosmonaut Sergey Kud-Sverchkov, who has been living and working in the orbiting laboratory since October, even shared images snapped from his orbital vantage point of the now-notorious Ever Given stuck in the Suez Canal.

Satellite photos: The huge ship stuck in the Suez Canal is visible from space

One of the most discussed news is the incident in the #SuezCanal. One of the world’s largest container ships #EverGiven has blocked one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes. Specialists are making every effort to restore shipping.You can see it now from the @SpaceStation: pic.twitter.com/PCKlFO5Ya1March 27, 2021

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“One of the most discussed news is the incident in the #SuezCanal,” Kud-Sverchkov wrote. “One of the world’s largest container ships #EverGiven has blocked one of the world’s busiest shipping lanes. Specialists are making every effort to restore shipping. You can see it now from the @SpaceStation.”

Satellites also monitored the situation, naturally.

Copernicus Sentinel-1 images taken on March 21, 2021, before Ever Given was stuck, and on March 25 show the build-up of ships waiting to pass through the Suez Canal. (Image credit: Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2021), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO)

The European Space Agency